Tag Archives: iron

Teach Me Tuesday – “Iron” Wall Art

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Hi All!

Before I get to Teach Me Tuesday, I wanted to share a video with you that made me laugh so hard.  Check out this hilarious kid at:

This Bowl is Too Heavy

This is video reminds me of when my kids were little. They were so dramatic about everything. Nothing has changed since they became teenagers – it is just a lot louder. I swear all I have to do is ask someone to bring the garbage cans in or feed the dogs and you would have thought I asked them to do hard labor in Siberia. They do it, but there is a whole lotta griping.

Today’s Teach Me Tuesday will be one of the easiest and cheapest projects I will show you. You only need 3 things:  a rubber doormat, a can of spray paint and sandpaper.  You will be able to make an amazing piece of artwork that looks just like an iron piece for your walls.  Iron is expensive.  This knock-off can be made for a fraction of the cost and looks just as expensive.  Plus you can customize it to be exactly what you want!

1.  A Rubber Doormat

You can find these everywhere right now – even the Dollar Store or Big Lots.  They are cheap and come in many different sizes, so use what suites you.  It is even okay to cut it up into pieces if you so desire. Be creative!

You can use your finished product horizontally or vertically.

2.  A Can of Spray Paint.  I like Antique White by Valspar.

3.  Sandpaper.

I like these sandpaper blocks, but you can really use any sandpaper you have laying around.  If you have an electric sander, you can use that also – makes it go a lot faster and saves your arm muscles.  You all know how I feel about sanding – it is a workout!  Note:  do not use 220 grit sandpaper like I have in this picture.  It will rip up your sanding block (I found this out the hard way).  I would use an 80 or 100 grit.

So those are the three products you need to complete this awesome project.  I just love simple supplies.  Here is what you do next:

Spray paint the rubber mat with the Antique White (or whatever color you choose).  Don’t worry about it being perfect, you are going to be sanding a lot of the edges to get that worn, rustic iron look.

I went over it a couple times, just to get into the corner and crevices.  Took me probably less than 10 minutes.  Yay!  Now – just sit back and wait for it to dry.

Okay … honesty time.  I went out to sand my mat and I only had the 220 grit sandpaper on hand.  So the next few pictures are not my finished product, but you will definitely get the idea of how cool this project looks when it is finished.

salvagedior.blogspot.com

salvagedior.blogspot.com

Source: salvagedior.blogspot.com via DeannaL on Pinterest

Close up of the finished product. Isn’t is amazing how it looks just like iron? Another plus is that it is so much lighter to hang on the wall. Do you ever hang a heavy art piece over your couch or your bed and obsess about when it is going to fall on your head? No? Oh, maybe those are my issues. Hmmmmm….

Source: salvagedior.blogspot.com via Georgeann on Pinterest

See how incredible the different shapes can look together? The half-moon mat really makes a statement on the wall!

Source: lemontreecreations.blogspot.com via CatchtheMoon on Pinterest

This is another way to use a rubber doormat. This is just the mat laid on top of a stained piece of wood. Then spray paint and peel back the mat. Beautiful!

Source: lemontreecreations.blogspot.com via Patricia on Pinterest

Another look … used four boards to make one piece of art. This is called an “image split”. You see it on canvases a lot.

Source: tungandsara.blogspot.com via Amy on Pinterest

Source: Uploaded by user via Jenna on Pinterest

That’s all for today! I am leaving tomorrow morning for my annual girlfriends weekend. I meet up with 8 friends that I have known since kindergarten. We get together once a year and laugh until we hurt.  The weekend is called GBB Weekend (Girl’s Behaving Badly) – enough said. I will have a special post on Wednesday with some pictures of the GBB gang. See you then!

Hope your life is more heaven than havoc!

Missi

Seeing Charleston by Horse and Carriage

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Happy Monday!  Hope everyone had a Happy Easter or Happy Passover (Chag Semach)!

We celebrated Easter with a relaxing afternoon watching the Masters (yay Bubba!) and a big meal that included a yummy glazed ham.  The kids watched movies and spent some time outside – it was a gorgeous day in Georgia!  It feels weird to have older kids now – they would rather eat the hard eggs than color them and I couldn’t get them to hide or find an egg if I paid them.  Of course they have no problem with wanting Easter baskets with presents.  Hmmm…. who’s a sucker?

I wanted to share my pictures of some amazing and exquisite homes in Charleston. I can’t promise that my pictures are perfect – I was not on solid ground.  I took these while riding in a horse and carriage and they stop for no one.

The gardens of this home were so incredible.  It looked like a movie set.  Couldn’t you just see yourself sitting here with a good book and a glass of sweet tea?  Oh my.

Another shot from the other side.  The trunk on this Crepe Myrtle is so perfect is actually looks fake.

This is a great shot of the Crepe’s lining the street.  The trunks had peeled and were revealing a beautiful burgundy color.  We had a couple in our carriage from Nova Scotia that had never seen a Crepe Myrtle – they just could not believe they were real trees.  We forget to take the time to enjoy the beauty of our trees and flowers in the south – we are so lucky to have such magnificent specimens.

The details of the homes in Charleston are like no where I have ever seen in the world.  Tons of moldings, railing, iron work – INCREDIBLE!  I love the contrast of the black shutters on the white brick.  So classic and inviting.

I know this looks like English Ivy, but it is not.  It is called Creeping Fig and is very prominent in Charleston.  It is not invasive like ivy – it does not invade the brick or stucco.  It is really stunning and regal.

Can you see the iron “thorns” on the top of this fence?  That was their barbed wire.  It was used for security in the 18th and 19th century.  This was common on some of the larger homes in the area.  You would even see little patches of it under windows or in corners to deter climbing of the houses.

This is three houses lined up next to each other.  So different but yet very similar.  Porches, columns and molding are abundant on all three of these houses.  Have I mentioned that homes in this area sell for between 7-10 million dollars?  Yep … just right for the average American.  Ha!

I could die over this cupola.  I am cupola crazy and I have to say this is one of the prettiest I have ever seen.  Gosh – between this upper deck and the cupola, I don’t know where I would sit first. **Big Sigh**

This is a full shot of the same house … three porches to choose from and a cupola?  Is someone trying to kill me?  Seriously.

Remember the three houses that were lined up?  This is a better shot of house 2 and 3.  The arches on house 3′s porch is so enticing and charming.

This is one house (or should I say compound).  How did anyone ever find each other in these homes?  I am pretty sure they did not have intercom systems back then … I am guessing there was a lot of yelling.  Hmmm… sounds like another house I know.

I think this house is stunning but it looks a little haunted to me.  Charleston is the number one city for hauntings in the world (so they claim).  We took a Ghost Tour on our last night of vacation.  I was hoping to be creeped out, but no such luck.  Would it kill one little ghost to show themselves for my enjoyment?  Oh right – kill is probably not an appropriate word here.  Oops!

The Live Oak in front of this house is as beautiful as the house.  It adds so much character to this yard.  Once again I am loving the arches and upper porch.

Heart Attack anyone?  Upper porch, cupola and hurricane shutters as well as a stunning brick fence around the property.  I love it!  Where is $10,000,000 when you need it?

Front of the “heart attack” house.  I learned something about these types of staircases going into the home.  A man was not allowed to see a woman’s ankles.  Ankles were considered very sexy back in the day.  So in order to avoid this, the woman would go up one side of the stairs and the man would go up the other.  This would prevent the man from accidentally seeing a peek of ankle skin.  The theory was, if you saw a woman’s ankle, you had to marry her.  Can you imagine?

I had to take a picture of this … the stairs are made out of MARBLE!  So refined and beautiful.  I hate to be a “Debbie Downer” … but can you imagine trying to get up these steps in the rain or snow?  I can barely get across my bathroom floor in wet feet.  I would be flat on my face.  But … they are gorgeous.

Enchanting … what else can I say?

Close up … there are those stairs again.  Wouldn’t want to see a sexy ankle …?  When is the last time you muttered that statement?  Never.

I had to take a picture of this iron fence because it had such meaning.  I hope you can see that every other picket is twisted.  Twisted iron or molding around the windows of your home meant you were very wealthy.  This was a way to brag to all your neighbors.  This home had twisting everywhere … he wasn’t a very well-liked man.

I wanted to show you an example of a stucco facade in addition to all the brick facades.  These are called Single Houses in Charleston.  They are similar to the Shot-gun House in New Orleans.  They are only one room wide.

Wonderful example of iron work.  I could have done an entire week’s worth of posts on just the iron in Charleston.

There are those damn marble steps again.  I still cannot deny their beauty even while flat on the wet ground.

This is the end of my tour.  I hope you enjoyed seeing all these amazing homes and maybe even learned something you didn’t know before.  If you ever get the chance you should take a trip to Charleston.  Between the homes, the history and the shopping you won’t be disappointed.

Hope your life is more heaven than havoc!

Missi

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